LNTUP

Santiago Bernabéu Stadium celebrating its 70th Birthday

The Santiago Bernabéu Stadium (Spanish: Estadio Santiago Bernabéu [esˈtaðjo sanˈtjaɣo βernaˈβeu̯]), is the home stadium of Real Madrid since its completion in 1947, with a current seating capacity of 81,044.
Santiago Bernabéu is one of the world’s most famous and prestigious football venues. It has hosted the European Cup/Champions League final on four occasions: in 1957, 1969, 1980 and 2010. The final matches for the 1964 European Nations’ Cup and the 1982 FIFA World Cup, were also held at the Bernabéu, thus making it the first stadium in Europe to host both a UEFA European Championship and a FIFA World Cup final.
Named after the club’s legendary president who headed Real Madrid between 1943 and 1978, the Santiago Bernabéu stadium was opened in 1947. It has a capacity for 81,044, 245 VIP boxes and four restaurants (La Esquina, Puerta 57, Real Café Bernabéu and Zen Market, all of them closed during matches).
Real Madrid is one of our city’s three professional football teams, together with Atlético de Madrid and Rayo Vallecano. The holder of multiple European and international titles, the club opens its doors 363 days a year for football and sports fans to explore its historic stadium.
History
On 22 June 1944, the Banco Mercantil e Industrial bank granted a credit to Santiago Bernabéu and Rafael Salgado for the purchase of the land adjacent to the old Ramin Amin. On 5 September 1944, architects Manuel Muñoz Monasterio and Luis Alemany Soler were hired and the structure on the site began to give way to the new stadium. On 27 October 1944, construction work on the stadium began. The Nuevo Estadio Chamartín (English: New Chamartín Stadium) was inaugurated on 14 December 1947 with a match between Real Madrid and the Portuguese side Os Belenenses, which resulted in a 3–1 victory for Los Blancos. The stadium had an initial capacity of 75,145 spectators, 27,645 of which had seats (7,125 covered) and 47,500 for standing fans. Sabino Barinaga was the first player to score in the new stadium.
The first major renovation occurred in 1955. On 19 June of that year, the stadium expanded to accommodate 125,000 spectators. Thus, the Madrid coliseum became the biggest stadium of all the participants of the newly established European Cup. On 4 January 1955, after the General Assembly of Members Compromisaros, it was decided that the stadium adopt its present name in honour of club President Santiago Bernabéu. In May 1957, Real Madrid used electric stadium lighting in a game against Sports Recife of Brazil.
At Present, According to the official website of the club, the current capacity is 81,044. On 16 October 2013, Pérez announced that Real Madrid was seeking to sell the naming rights for its stadium and looking for a sponsor for the €400 million renovation project. The proposed design of the stadium renovation, produced by German architects GMP, was unveiled on 31 January 2014. The bold design includes a retractable roof, with the overall cost of around €400 million likely to be met half via the sale of naming rights and half via a bond issue to Real members according to Spanish media reports. Pérez said, “We want to make the Santiago Bernabéu the best stadium in the world.” Real Madrid then announced a sponsorship agreement with IPIC to assist the club in the redevelopment of the stadium. Pérez then said that in compliance with the agreement the name of the stadium would be renamed “IPIC Bernabeu” or “CEPSA Bernabeu”. The surface has been replaced with Mixto hybrid grass.
Major International Tournament
Euro 1964
Santiago Bernabéu hosted three matches of the 1964 European Nations’ Cup, a tournament which Spain hosted: one qualifying match and two in the main tournament, including the final. All of the matches involved Spain. Santiago Bernabéu hosted three matches of the 1964 European Nations’ Cup, a tournament which Spain hosted: one qualifying match and two in the main tournament, including the final. All of the matches involved Spain.
Final
The match was contested by the 1960 winners, the Soviet Union, and the hosts, Spain, at the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium in Madrid. Spain won the match 2–1, with goals coming from Jesús María Pereda and Marcelino. Galimzyan Khusainov scored for the Soviet Union.
1982 FIFA World Cup
In the 1982 World Cup held in Spain, the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium hosted four matches: three in the second round (West Germany–England, West Germany–Spain and Spain–England) as well as the final between West Germany and Italy.
Final
After a scoreless first half during which Antonio Cabrini fired a penalty low and wide to the right of goal, Paolo Rossi scored first, heading home a bouncing Claudio Gentile cross from the right from close range. Marco Tardelli then scored from the edge of the area with a low left-footed shot before Alessandro Altobelli, at the end of a counterattack by winger Bruno Conti, made it 3–0 with another low left footed shot. Italy’s lead appeared secure, encouraging Italian president Sandro Pertini to wag his finger at the cameras in a playful ‘not going to catch us now’ gesture from the stands. Paul Breitner scored for Germany in the 83rd minute, firing low past the goalkeeper from the right, but Italy held on to claim their first World Cup title in 44 years, and they are third in total with a 3–1 victory.
Other Major Games
1957 European Cup Final
This match was contested between Real Madrid, champions of Spain, and Fiorentina, champions of Italy. In this season, 16 teams played for the trophy. Real Madrid won 2–0 in the final after goals from Alfredo Di Stéfano and Francisco Gento in the second half. This was the second consecutive European Cup for Real Madrid after having won his first trophy one year before, in the Parc des Princes against Stade de Reims.
1969 European Cup Final
This year Milan, champions of Italy, played Ajax, champions of the Netherlands, to determine who would be the champions of Europe. Milan defeated Ajax 4–1 to win their second European championship. Ajax made history by being the first Dutch team to reach a final.
1980 European Cup Final
In this final, defending champions Nottingham Forest of England faced Hamburger SV, champions of Germany. The match ended with a victory for the English team with a 1–0 result. The new champions of Europe retained the trophy and achieved a historic second consecutive European Cup.
2010 UEFA Champions League Final
A game played between two best teams in Champion’s League which consists of group stage and knock-out stage. The Final is played at a different stadium each year. In 2010, Bayern Munich, who eliminated Lyon in the semi-finals, faced Internazionale, who defeated Barcelona in the semi-finals. Inter won 2–0 after two goals from Diego Milito.
Renovation Plans
The €400 million project is set to begin in summer 2017. The capacity will not be increased and will remain at 81,000 seats. It is still unknown what will be the name of the stadium, as it will change due to the sponsorship agreement. The stadium will grow ten metres in height and the roof will be added. The work is expected to last three years and the stadium is aimed to be finished at the beginning of the 2020–21 season.
In order for the project not to get in the way of playing matches, the team will use Roman techniques with raising the top, which will make it easier for the works to continue while the season is underway and there are matches once or twice a week. “The project is complex because it will not stop the football and therefore complicates the works and design, which has a roof that encloses the whole stadium. They are going to lift the roof like the Romans did, but with modern technology. They will raise the inner ring by string-pulling with hydraulic jacks, bridge technology and ski lifts in a short period of time in the summer to respect the sporting calendar,” said Tristán López Chicheri, the individual in charge of the renovation.
Chicheri believes the renovation will bring tourists to the stadium all year round, with many attractions planned. The stadium is supposed to have more restaurants, a shopping centre and a hotel, with some rooms having a view of the pitch. “It is not only on match days that it will be used – there are venues like the Bernabéu that are in the middle of the city and it is a shame that they have no life beyond 35–40 matches a year,” noted Chicheri. The areas around the Bernabéu will be rearranged: the Plaza de Los Sagrados Corazones will be removed to be replaced by 6,000 square metres of gardens.